04062017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_004.jpg
04062017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_003.jpg
04062017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_002.jpg
04062017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_001.jpg
03272017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_001.jpg
03272017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_002.jpg
02132017_-_Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_001.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_008.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_007.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_005.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_006.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_004.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_003.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_002.jpg
EMPIRE_UK_-_04_2017_FIST_OF_FURY_001.jpg
20-minutes-edition-france-2014-10-14-18.jpg
02102017_-Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_013.jpg
02102017_-Celebrity_Sightings_in_New_York_City_012.jpg
 20 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

I have a photoshoot of Charlie added to the gallery. This one is from 2015, and done to promote the season one debut of DAREDEVIL. #CharlieCox #Daredevil

  • [004] PHOTOSHOOT: 04/02/2015 – CHARLIE COX POSES IN LOS ANGELES

   

 19 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

A fantastic list here of the DAREDEVIL season two Easter Eggs from the Youtube Channel MCU Exchange. I love this list. It pretty much encapsulates what I found to be the best of the current comic book programs out there. Enjoy.

 17 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

Some new images of Charlie and the cast of INCOGNITO a play Charlie is preparing for on Broadway. Congrats to him and here’s hoping the run is a success.

  • [017] EVENT IMAGES: 04/08/2016 – CAST MEET & GREET OF INCOGNITO

    

 14 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

Charlie has stated there is still not talk about the possibility of him taking Matt/Daredevil onto the big screen. Personally given the success of the show, I’d say Marvel would be insane not to transfer Charlie and the other actors into the larger cinematic universe. I mean you have Deborah Ann Woll (Karen Page) and her background with True Blood, then Elden Henson (Foggy Nelson) and his success with the Hunger Games films, then you have Elodie Yung (Elektra Nachios) and her big screen presence already established, then there’s both Ayelot Zuerer (Vanessa Marianna) and Vincent D’Onofrio (Wilson Fisk) and their big screen successes, and who can’t believe that Jon Bernthal (Frank Castle/Punisher) aren’t big screen worthy? The entire cast and show are ready to make that transition. The show is that good. So come on Marvel, let’s bring Deredevil into that pantheon of our Earth’s Greatest Heroes.

Daredevil won’t show up in a Marvel movie, says actor Charlie Cox

The British actor says there has been “no conversation” about making the leap from Netflix to movies such as the upcoming “Captain America: Civil War”.

It doesn’t look as though Daredevil or any of Marvel’s TV heroes will show up in the comic book giant’s movies anytime soon. With “Captain America: Civil War” uniting a vast cast of big-screen heroes in just a matter of weeks, “Daredevil” star Charlie Cox has ruled out an appearance.

“There was no conversation about joining any of the movies,” the British star said, adding that he would jump at the chance to appear in a Marvel movie. “Who wouldn’t want to be in the highest-grossing film of all time?”

“Civil War” is already stuffed to bursting with Marvel heroes, as Captain America and Iron Man lead opposing factions into a superpowered dust-up. New faces include Black Panther and a new version of Spider-Man, so adding Daredevil into the mix might be a bit much. Still, we’ve got a lot of love for Daredevil and his pals on Netflix, and it would be fun to have the small-screen superheroes stretch their superpowers on the big screen at some point.

Cox was speaking on stage at a showcase event here in Paris held by Netflix, the streaming service that produces “Daredevil”. Netflix executives and actors from its shows are in France to spotlight new productions, including the company’s first French and British shows.

“Daredevil” was the first of four Netflix shows to feature a Marvel hero, followed by “Jessica Jones” which debuted last year, “Luke Cage”, which is due in September, and “Iron Fist”, which is currently in production. Once all four have aired, the heroes will unite as super-team The Defenders in an eponymous mini-series, also on Netflix.

Unless he shows up in “Luke Cage” or “Iron Fist” — and with an appearance in “Civil War” apparently ruled out — “The Defenders” will be the next time we’ll see Cox in costume, as the miniseries will arrive before series three of “Daredevil”.

Cox describes the various Marvel-Netflix series as “very different shows…I’m interested to know how tonally they will become one.”

SOURCE

 12 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

Charlie has let it slip who is responsible for forming THE DEFENDERS. Apparently it’s none other than The Devil of Hell’s Kitchen. Now who would have doubted that?

It Sounds Like [SPOILER] Is The One Who Assembles THE DEFENDERS

After revealing that The Defenders starts shooting later this year, Charlie Cox has shed some light on who assembles this team of street level superheroes and their reasons for doing so. Check it out…

The chances of a third season for Daredevil are unclear as of right now, and it sounds as if the next place we’ll see The Man Without Fear is in The Defenders based on comments from Charlie Cox yesterday. Now, the actor has shed some light on how that team will come together, seemingly confirming in the process that it’s Daredevil who leads the team.

“He can’t do this alone. He’s been so adamant about being a lone wolf, about doing it himself, so I think that in order for him to get to The Defenders we needed this second season. We needed to see him be broken individually so that he can – he’s willing to form a team. The lesson that Matt has had to learn in the second season of Daredevil is that he needs help.”

That sounds pretty much perfect, and Daredevil taking charge makes a lot of sense.

After all, he’s by far the most popular of these heroes (though that could change when Luke Cage and Iron Fist hit Netflix) and you can understand why he’d turn to this lot for help against a threat as big as The Hand, assuming they’re the big bads of The Defenders. If they are, that will leave the door open to Daredevil season three adapting “Born Again” as many of us have been hoping…

SOURCE

 12 April, 2016
 Author: charlie cox online -  Leave a Comment

I’ve been going through some of Charlie’s interviews and this one really struck me as cute. Apparently Charlie’s mother sends him his bad reviews. Talk about counter productive for a parent, though my guess is that his mom knows Charlie well enough. There’s also some funny moments where Charlie talks about the language barrier between over The Pond. Read on.

Charlie Cox on playing Daredevil: ‘My Mum sends me all my bad reviews’

By day, he’s a blind lawyer. By night, he’s a fearless crimefighter who sees with his ears. As Daredevil returns, the first Brit to play him talks about disliking superheroes, glorifying violence and rejecting Downton

“I get to stand on a roof looking heroic,” says Charlie Cox. “I get to put on a Spandex suit and run around punching people.” He’s talking about playing Daredevil, The Man With No Fear (or Eyesight, though that doesn’t seem much of a hindrance to his super-violent, super-gymnastic super-heroics). So he likes the part? “I love it,” he says.

Cox, 33, has taken a role once played by Ben Affleck and made it his own – despite being largely unknown and the first non-American to play Matt Murdock, the blind lawyer who moonlights in tights and fights.

In season two, which launches on Netflix on Friday, DD is back in his now-souped-up supergear: pec-hugging body armour and, even better, a helmet with horns. This is a much-needed upgrade of his seriously uncool old outfit, which was topped by what can only be described as a tea cosy. He also gets not one but two love interests, as well as a smattering of new baddies to throw through flimsy sets, not to mention several personal dilemmas.

Cox plays Daredevil as The Man With No Fear But With Plenty of Flaws and Scars. “He has this Catholic guilt,” says Cox, “which is unusual in a superhero.” Cox really gets Murdock’s angst, he says, having been brought up in the faith himself.

It may be an adaptation of a comic book, but Marvel’s Daredevil is especially gruesome and definitely not for the squeamish: one villain impales himself on a spike headfirst; another is bludgeoned to death with a bowling ball; while a crime boss removes a Russian flunkey’s head with a car door.

Is Cox happy about all this gore? “I don’t feel comfortable with the glorification of violence,” he says. “But, as an actor who has had long periods of unemployment, you have to be lenient with your convictions.”

Sitting in a suite at the Mandarin hotel in Paris, Cox certainly seems more comfortable centre-stage than he was back in 2007 when he said: “Fame terrifies me.” But he’s still not entirely at ease: “My reaction when I hear the word celebrity is, ‘Who, me?’ It doesn’t feel like I’m famous. I don’t get hounded in the street. I live in New York, where people don’t give a shit who you are. Thus far, touch wood, my life has changed very little.”

Cox discovered a passion for acting at Sherborne school in Dorset, though he was frustrated that all its productions were musicals (he can’t sing, he says). With his parents’ encouragement, he shunned university and went to Bristol Old Vic drama school. In 2007, he played Tristan Thorn in Stardust opposite Robert De Niro and Michele Pfeiffer.

He also played the Duke of Crowborough in the Downton Abbey pilot, but by the time the series was commissioned had signed up for the Martin Scorsese-produced show Boardwalk Empire. In that, he played Owen Sleater, a cheeky Irishman who works for (and falls for the wife of) Nucky, the corrupt politician brought so nastily to life by Steve Buscemi.

Doesn’t this suggest drama is more his thing? Cox admits he is “not a fan of the superhero genre”, but he was drawn to the script because it felt “like a crime drama with superhero peppering on top”.

Blinded in an accident as a child, Murdock’s hearing becomes so acute that he can hear a watch tick across a crowded courtroom or identify a lying witness by their racing heart. As Daredevil, he confronts baddies – from car thieves to bikers, from wife-beaters to gangs of Irish, Mexican and Russian psychopaths – in the rundown NY district of Hell’s Kitchen, leaving them down but never dead, in the style of the original comics.

The new season cranks up DD’s capacity for angst as the lines between good and evil blur, leaving him agonising over whether he has the right to play god. “Daredevil’s religion makes him unique,” says Cox. “He’s a vigilante, but he’s also a lawyer – and all the while, he believes only God is capable of bringing people to justice.”

Can these three conflicting things be reconciled? The battle to do so is what drew Cox to the character whose own flaws are all too evident. “I was interested in Matt’s inner demons. He’s like an alcoholic – he can’t stop. He puts on the suit and all bets are off.” Does Cox have his own inner demons? “Doesn’t everyone? I’ve struggled for confidence and had great doubts about myself. But, personally, I’m not riddled with guilt.”

Although he is no longer afraid of the spotlight, Cox still suffers flashes of insecurity. “I didn’t read the critics last year. I was very, very nervous – when I was cast there was a lot of, ‘This guy doesn’t look right.’ But my mum finds those comments rather amusing and forwards them to me. Good for her. It makes me take it all less seriously.”

Cox says one of the biggest challenges has been acting blind and using a white cane. He was blindfolded and taken round New York by Joe Strechey, who works as a consultant to the series and is himself blind. “It was quite literally the blind leading the blind,” he says. “Crossing roads was an ordeal. It seems archaic, in this day and age, that people with vision loss are still using a white cane to get around.”

Cox has had to perfect his New York accent for the part, but it’s not the only language issue he has faced. “The other day,” he says, “we were discussing something with the director. He said: ‘How important is it to you?’ I said: ‘Look, I’m not going to throw my dummy out of the pram.’ The whole crew stared at me as if I was insane. I could see them all trying to translate it, so I had to stop, think, then repeat: ‘I’m not going to throw my pacifier out of the stroller.’”

SOURCE